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Opana 40 mg bluelight:
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In 2007, Purdue and three of its executives pled guilty to federal charges for misleading doctors, patients, and regulators about the risk of addiction and OxyContin's potential to be abused. As described in its plea agreement, Purdue systematically misrepresented the risk of addiction, including promising that opioid addiction occurred in less than 1% of patients and that opioids were not addictive when legitimately prescribed. This was how Purdue explained away what doctors had previously believed about opioids: it was not that opioids were not addictive, but rather opioids would not addict patients under a doctor's care. Purdue knew, and evidence showed, that Purdue's reformulated OxyContin, and its later-released Hysingla, which it also promoted as abuse-deterrent could be easily defeated, did not affect oral use, which is the most common means of abuse, and increased harmful outcomes. In 2012, Purdue filed a Citizen Petition [2] seeking a ruling from the FDA that Purdue's removal of the original OxyContin was for safety reasons and generic products approved as bioequivalent to the older formulation should be removed from the market unless they could demonstrate similar tamper resistance. This effort was successful and allowed Purdue to defeat generic competition for the drug just one day before Purdue faced loss of patent protection. Yet, there were no long-term studies to support Purdue's claims, and tellingly, after it successfully removed generic competition, Purdue in 2015 abruptly withdrew a supplemental new drug application related to reformulated OxyContin one day before FDA staff were to release its assessment of the application. A FDA review acknowledged that "unusual means" could result in extraction of the active ingredient for snorting or injection. Purdue's ADF opioids reduced opioid abuse and diversion, which is false. Purdue failed to tell doctors and consumers that its ADF opioids had no impact on oral abuse. c. Indeed, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration ("FDA") confirmed thefalsity of Defendants' representations in recent public statements ( see ¶ 63 infra. ) and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention ("CDC") exhaustively reviewed the evidence on opioids in its 2016 Guideline for Prescribing Opioids for Chronic Pain ("CDC Guideline"). 25. Defendants continued to tell doctors and consumers that opioids relieved pain when used long-term, without any studies to support this claim and without disclosing the lack of evidence that opioids were safe or effective long-term or the other risks from long-term use of opioids. d. Purdue's ADF opioids were safer than other opioids, which is false. 16. October 1, 2017 City of Newark's Complaint Against Opioid Manufacturers. Andrew J. D'Arcy ID# 044811996 D'Arcy Johnson Day 3120 Fire Road Egg Harbor Township, New Jersey 08234 (609) 641-6200. Rather than compassionately helping patients, this explosion in opioid use—and Defendants' profits—has come at the expense of chronic pain patients. The CDC concluded in 2016 that "for the vast majority of [chronic pain] patients, the known, serious, and too-often-fatal risks [of opioids] far outweigh the unproven and transient benefits." [3]. Kenyatta K. Stewart ID#: 028502007 Acting Corporation Counsel City of Newark City Hall, Room 316 Newark, New Jersey 07012 (973) 733-3880. Because the medical community recognized the dangers of opioid use, they originally used opioids cautiously and sparingly, typically only for short-term acute pain—where brief use limited the need for escalating doses and the risk of addiction—or for palliative (end-of-life) care. [1]. In the same vein, Purdue and Endo also misrepresented their efforts to rein in the diversion and abuse of opioids, while privately failing to report suspicious prescribing. Along with the launch of reformulated OxyContin, Purdue also launched a new campaign—capitalizing upon growing concern about the rising tide of opioid addiction, overdose, and death—falsely promoting the effectiveness of its abuse-deterrent opioids in preventing abuse. Like pseudoaddiction, this marketing was intended to, and did, reassure prescribers and consumers who became concerned about addiction that they not only could continue to prescribe and take opioids, but in fact needed to switch to Purdue's opioids because they were safer. To this day, Defendants have failed to correct their earlier misrepresentations, and, in many respects, persist in the same types of misconduct. Prescription opioids are narcotics. They are derived from and possess properties similar to opium and heroin, and they are regulated as controlled substances. While opioids can dampen the perception of pain, they also can create an addictive, euphoric high. At higher doses, opioids can slow the user's breathing, causing potentially fatal respiratory depression. Most patients receiving more than a few weeks of opioid therapy will experience often prolonged withdrawal symptoms—including severe anxiety, nausea, headaches, tremors, delirium, and pain—if opioid use is delayed or discontinued. When using opioids continuously, patients grow tolerant to their analgesic effects—requiring progressively higher doses and increasing the risks of withdrawal, addiction, and overdose. Defendants continued to tell doctors and consumers that opioids could be taken in higher and higher doses without disclosing the ensuing risk to the patient. e. Defendants Purdue Pharma, L.P., Purdue Pharma Inc., and the Purdue Frederick Company (collectively "Purdue"), Teva Pharmaceuticals USA, Inc. and Cephalon, Inc. (collectively, "Cephalon"), Janssen Pharmaceuticals, Inc. and Ortho-McNeil-Janssen Pharmaceuticals, Inc., Janssen Pharmaceutica Inc. (collectively "Janssen"), Endo Health Solutions Inc., and Endo Pharmaceuticals Inc. (collectively "Endo") manufacture, market, and sell prescription opioid pain medications, including the brand-name drugs OxyContin, Butrans, Hysingla ER, Actiq, Fentora, Opana/Opana ER, Percodan, Percocet, Zydone and Duragesic. Every day, 91 people die across the country from an opioid-related overdose and over 1,000 patients are administered emergency treatment for misusing opioids. Many oth The increased volume of opioid prescribing correlates directly to skyrocketing addiction, overdose, and death; black markets for diverted prescription opioids; and a concomitant rise in heroin and fentanyl abuse by individuals who could no longer legally acquire—or simply could not afford—prescription opioids. Defendants continued to tell doctors and consumers that patients receiving opioid prescriptions for pain generally would not become addicted, and that doctors could use screening tools to exclude patients who might. b. Because Opana ER could be "readily prepared for injection" and was linked to outbreaks of HIV and a serious blood disease, in June 2017, the FDA requested that Endo withdraw Opana ER from the market. Endo has since agreed to stop selling Opana. Defendants also developed new deceptive marketing practices in response to increasing awareness of the problems with opioids. Rather than admit responsibility, Defendants simply blamed abuse and addiction on people snorting or injecting opioids. Defendants' deceptive marketing caused prescribing not only of Purdue opioids, but of opioids as a class, to skyrocket. Opioids are now among the most prescribed classes of drugs. In 2015, health care providers wrote enough opioid prescriptions to medicate every American around the clock for three weeks, and on an average day, more than 650,000 opioid prescriptions are dispensed in the U.S. In 2015, Newark saw more than 1,500 people admitted for opioid (including heroin)-related substance abuse treatment and more than 1,600 people sought treatment for these conditions in 2016. i am new to this greenlighting stuff so sorry if i offend anyone. I am just excited to find other people to talk to about this drug my doc has me on. I'll have to ttry eating before than doing small lines to get it in better, and yes I have a very high tolerance naturally, I'll snort one 30 and be decent I could do two of those and be stoned probably. So, the problem here is that you aren't on nearly enough oxycodone, and you're likely going through withdrawal. I would take this up with your doctor, since otherwise you're going to end up blowing through your script in a week and having to supplement your dosage with illicit activities, and that's not a viable option when you need this medication for pain. I would talk to your doc and try to get back on the Opana, or tell him that you did the research and you're only on about 1/4 to 1/5th the amount of oxycodone that you should be in order to receive the pain relief, and that at the dosage you're at now, not only are you not receiving adequate pain control, but you're actually going through withdrawal. Any decent doctor will listen and help. Snorting BA is not 80-90% more like 40-45%. Eating a heavy meal will help orally, but I'm not sure about nasally. I have only done Opana once.. and there is not too much information on it that I know of. Hopefully someone else will help. And no I can't get the IR's I want to so bad, I used to get 300 4mg Dilaudids and used to boot those, that was heaven, I can never find that high again but heard that opana's could give me that High again, but all I have access too are the ER's. Now does Acetone really work??? I've heard of people doing that and also heard of people saying that it doesn't work. So I want some real actually advice from people that have done it and had success cause I'm scared of using shit like that and slamming soemthing that possibly still has it left over. You open up a bag of mixed nuts, and you hope for a cashew. If you hadn't written this, I would have just hit the back button, but since you did, I'm going to take the time to say:. OOk I just want to thank bluelight and also ask a question at the same time. I was reading up and saw alot of confused responses and posts about taking it orally, Iv'ed, Plugging, and Snorting. So you can't IV the ER's as we all know (unless TimerRX has been passed!!! please lemme know;-)) and can't really be plugged successfully (another arugement) so it lies between taking it orally and snorting it. Now orally the bioavailability is 10% i was told or read on bluelight correct? And snorting it is somewhere around 80-90%?? and also to eat a fatty meal after (BTW I just snorted it and am feeling already better (30mg) than i did with oral 15min after should I make up some deep fried fries?? Would that work with salt and some goodass ketchup would that count??) Now The question is I wanna ask and get out there that wasn't EVER clearly answered, and if was I apologize for wasting time (i'll make up for it by supporting bluelight with my huge drug knowledge (just not opana;-)) Is IS it actually better tyo just snort it, yes it gels up and is gelling up in my nose, but I'm fucked. But i read people saying different things well different people different bodies different responses obviously, but majority would say is that bioavailability percentage correct? Anything you know about opana on top of that quesiton would be appreciated THANK YOU!!! I was just switched from Opana ER 15 mg which, ashamed to say, was snorting. Copay was so high doc switched me to MS oxycontin ER 20 mg. Doc said I would not go through withdrawal from just switching over but I sure feel like crap. It's been 4 days now. I am taking the oxy whole as directed but did snort a half of oxy here and there just to feel better. Am I truly going through withdrawal? I feel so sick. My family doctor is good but I am sure he is not an expert on withdrawal. Can anyone help me? I use opana all the time. Snorting is good and their is alittle gel. I "blow" the gel back up to where it originally "landed" from snorting, and keep it there for as long as a can. Ive IVed opana aswell and what I do is soak the powder (crushed pill) in acetone for about an hour. Then evaportated all the acetone and then its realdy to be shot just like a regular pill. Be very careful as opana is very strong. Also eating a very fatty meal 30-45 minutes before and a hour after dosing helps a lot I've found out.. Snorting BA is not 80-90% more like 40-45%. Eating a heavy meal will help orally, but I'm not sure about nasally. I have only done Opana once.. and there is not too much information on it that I know of. Hopefully someone else will help. yes i believe that it is w/d you are going through. Snorting BA is not 80-90% more like 40-45%. Eating a heavy meal will help orally, but I'm not sure about nasally. I have only done Opana once.. and there is not too much information on it that I know of. Hopefully someone else will help. from what i understand taking opana by you rectum is the best way to get the full dose of the opiate. From what i found on the web is you get 80 percent of the drug instead of 20% oraly or 40% by snorting it. If anyone tries this method let me know how it goes. I was prescribed 5mg opana ir for 3 herniated disks in lower back and 2 bulging and spinal stenosis. also have moderate degenerative disk disease. I don't think you're going to get a lot of replies- your question is very confusing and not TO THE POINT. Most of us will just press the back button when we see a big paragraph like this. I AM CURRENTLY ON FENTANYL 100MCG/HR AND HAD BEEN LOOKING FOR A BREAKTHROUGH PAIN MED INSTANT RELEASE THAT WORKED AND LET ME TELL YOU THIS MUCH. ..I HAVE TRIED THEM ALL LAST WEEK I WAS PUT ON OPANA IR AND I WILL TELL YOU THIS MUCH. IT WAS PAINFUL TO MOVE IN THE SLIGHTEST BIT BEFORE AND THIS MEDICATION HAS GIVING ME HOPE BACK..I CAN MOVE WALK F**K YOU NAME IT AND IT IS INCREDIBLY STRONG. AS FAR AS EUPHORIA. IT HAS SOME BUT I TAKE OPANA 5MG IR AND THEN TAKE A 350MG SOMA WITH IT. YOU THINK YOU FLEW ON OXYCODONE..YOU DONT EVEN KNOW WHAT FLYING IS UNTIL YOU TRY THIS COMBINATION. TALK ABOUT ALMOST 100 % PAIN RELIEF. STILL BE ABLE TO THINK PLUS SAVE THE CITY FROM THE FORCES OF EVIL LOL OXYMORPHONE IS BY FAR THE STRONGEST MEDICATION I HAVE EVER TAKEN AND NOW TAKING THE SOMA WITH IT MAKES THIS NOT JUST A PAIN RELIEF EXPERIENCE BUT ONE OF THE BEST EUPHORIA SENSATIONS YOU WILL FEEL MAYBE CLOSE TO IF YOU WERE ACTUALLY FLYING HAHA NOW I WILL SAY ONE THING. THIS IS JUST BY ORAL. I AM NOT A SNORTER OR A PLUGGER NOT WILL I MAINLINE ANYTHING BUT I KNOW WHAT IV PAIN MEDS FROM HOSPITAL FEEL LIKE. AND THIS IS WAY BEYOND THAT AT JUST THE ORAL LEVERL. I AM LUCKY ENOUGH TO HAVE A GOOD DOC THAT GIVES ME THE FENTANL 100MCG PATCH TO CHANGE EVERY 48 HOURS SO 15 A MONTH INCASE THEY DO NOT STICK WELL PLUS 90 OPANA IR EVERY 3 WEEKS. ITS NOT MANY TIMES I HAVE SAID THIS BUT BECAREFUL WITH THE DOSAGE ON. Eat a fatty meal. Wait 20 minutes. Crush into a very very fine powder, snort small lines. If you have a tolerance, snort many small lines. It's a lot better than snorting one or two big lines. With the fatty meal and small lines, there will be a difference. Thank you for all your guys help and fast response.. sry for such long posts at the begining I was really stoned and curious lol you guys can understand. Then i read up about snorting it and it fucked me up. The fatty meal also helped after taking it. Try to get the IR's as they are much more body friendly, in fact, imho, 10mg IR is just as good if not better than a 20mg ER (maybe more) in fact there are only 2 fillers in the irs that arent water soluable and to get almost pure oxymorphone is easy to do (with a little bit of leg work). It seems like your doctor didn't really do a great job of converting the dosages between these two drugs before he switched you. Opana is 6-8 times more potent than morphine (IV), and IV morphine and IV oxycodone are equianalgesic, IIRC. oxycodone has fairly decent oral BA, something around 90%, so 15 mg of opana/oxymorphone would be about equal to 90-120 mg of oxycodone, although we're talking IV dosages here so it may be a little more oxycodone orally. A friend of mine told me that you could possibly put the opana er in a little bowl and add some antacid, let it sit overnight and let dry, This kind of mimmicks the stomach and may or may not, help get rid of the timerx,. The City of Newark brings this action pursuant to its statutory and common law authority to redress Purdue Pharma, L.P.'s; Purdue Pharma, Inc.'s, the Purdue Frederick Company's, Teva Pharmaceuticals USA's, Cephalon, Inc.'s, Janssen Pharmaceuticals, Inc.'s, Ortho-McNeil-Janssen Pharmaceuticals, Inc.'s, Janssen Pharmaceutical Inc.'s, Endo Health Solutions Inc.'s, and Endo Pharmaceuticals Inc.'s (together, "Defendants") campaign of unfairly and deceptively marketing and falsely advertising opioids, for creating a public nuisance, for fraud, and for unjust enrichment. 2. In 2007, Purdue and three of its executives pled guilty to federal charges for misleading doctors, patients, and regulators about the risk of addiction and OxyContin's potential to be abused. As described in its plea agreement, Purdue systematically misrepresented the risk of addiction, including promising that opioid addiction occurred in less than 1% of patients and that opioids were not addictive when legitimately prescribed. This was how Purdue explained away what doctors had previously believed about opioids: it was not that opioids were not addictive, but rather opioids would not addict patients under a doctor's care. Purdue's guilty plea seemed to have little effect on Purdue's operations and marketing, or that of other Defendants. In the decade that followed, Defendants created and sustained a multi-billion dollar pain franchise through the same pattern of deceptive marketing. Specifically: a. Defendants continued to tell doctors and consumers that patients receiving opioid prescriptions for pain generally would not become addicted, and that doctors could use screening tools to exclude patients who might. b. The increased volume of opioid prescribing correlates directly to skyrocketing addiction, overdose, and death; black markets for diverted prescription opioids; and a concomitant rise in heroin and fentanyl abuse by individuals who could no longer legally acquire—or simply could not afford—prescription opioids. Purdue's ADF opioids could not be crushed or snorted, which is false. b. Defendants continued to tell doctors and consumers that opioids could be taken in higher and higher doses without disclosing the ensuing risk to the patient. e. Purdue's ADF opioids were safer than other opioids, which is false. 16. Indeed, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration ("FDA") confirmed thefalsity of Defendants' representations in recent public statements ( see ¶ 63 infra. ) and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention ("CDC") exhaustively reviewed the evidence on opioids in its 2016 Guideline for Prescribing Opioids for Chronic Pain ("CDC Guideline"). 25. As Purdue developed OxyContin in the mid-1990s, it knew that to expand its market and profits, it needed to change the perception of opioids to permit and encourage the use of opioids long-term for widespread chronic conditions, like back pain, migraines, and arthritis. Purdue, together with the other Defendants, helped cultivate a narrative that pain was undertreated and that pain treatment should be a higher priority for health care providers. This effort paved the way for increased prescribing of opioids for chronic pain. Defendants' promotional efforts dovetailed with this narrative, as Defendants began to promote opioids generally, and their own opioids in particular, as safe, effective, and appropriate for even long-term use for routine pain conditions. As part of this strategy, Defendants misrepresented to prescribers and consumers the risk of addiction for pain patients as modest, manageable, and outweighed by the benefits of opioid use. 6. Consequently, the market for prescription opioids was sharply restricted. 5. Defendants continued to tell doctors and consumers that opioids relieved pain when used long-term, without any studies to support this claim and without disclosing the lack of evidence that opioids were safe or effective long-term or the other risks from long-term use of opioids. d. Defendants' scheme was resoundingly successful. Chronic opioid therapy—the prescribing of opioids long-term to treat chronic pain—has been a commonplace, and often first-line, treatment since at least the mid-2000s. While previously a small minority of opioid sales, today between 80% and 90% of opioids (measured by weight) used are for chronic pain. In 2015, Purdue reaped an estimated $2.4 billion in revenue, virtually all of it from opioids. Since its launch in 1996, OxyContin alone has generated $35 billion in sales. Rather than compassionately helping patients, this explosion in opioid use—and Defendants' profits—has come at the expense of chronic pain patients. The CDC concluded in 2016 that "for the vast majority of [chronic pain] patients, the known, serious, and too-often-fatal risks [of opioids] far outweigh the unproven and transient benefits." [3]. Through these efforts, Defendants were able to persuade doctors and consumers that opioids were not addictive, despite the previous medical consensus and scientific evidence to the contrary. Defendants convinced prescribers and consumers that, even if opioids had some limited potential to be addictive, any risk of addiction could be managed by doctors carefully supervising their use by appropriate patients. Part of Defendants' message was that doctors should treat the right patients: legitimate patients who took the drugs as directed (orally) to treat their pain, rather than abusers seeking to snort or inject the drugs for recreation. By defining the class of individuals who should not receive opioids as only these abusers, Defendants gave doctors and consumers a false sense of security that they could safely prescribe opioids to patients they trusted. Purdue's ADF opioids reduced opioid abuse and diversion, which is false. Purdue failed to tell doctors and consumers that its ADF opioids had no impact on oral abuse. c. Defendants' deceptive marketing caused prescribing not only of Purdue opioids, but of opioids as a class, to skyrocket. Opioids are now among the most prescribed classes of drugs. In 2015, health care providers wrote enough opioid prescriptions to medicate every American around the clock for three weeks, and on an average day, more than 650,000 opioid prescriptions are dispensed in the U.S. In 2015, Newark saw more than 1,500 people admitted for opioid (including heroin)-related substance abuse treatment and more than 1,600 people sought treatment for these conditions in 2016. Defendant Purdue Pharma continued to tell doctors and consumers that OxyContin provided 12 hours of relief when Purdue knew that, for many patients, it did not. 14. Purdue Frederick Company; TEVA PHARMACEUTICALS USA, INC.; CEPHALON, INC.; JOHNSON & JOHNSON; JANSSEN. October 1, 2017 City of Newark's Complaint Against Opioid Manufacturers. PHARMACEUTICALS, INC.; ENDO HEALTH SOLUTIONS INC.; and ENDO PHARMACEUTICALS,